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Recruiter's News and Articles

Every team or department is made up of individuals who have their own unique strengths and weaknesses. Yet there’s usually one or two workers who rise to the top; their work – and work ethic – stand out from the rest.

So, what do you do when your star employee announces he or she is leaving for another opportunity?

You knew deep down it was likely to happen – in today’s market, top talent is in high demand. Do you find a way to try and make the person stay? Or do you focus on recruiting another stand out? Here are some options to consider when your best worker leaves.

Imagine you are currently working on filling one particular job posting. Your mind wanders and you are tempted to check the number of applicants you got for another job posting. Should you resist the temptation? Research suggests that, as a general rule, you most definitely should! Multitasking kills productivity.

 

Seven Things Great Employers Do (That Others Don't)

by Peter Flade, Jim Harter, and Jim Asplund
 
THESE ARE THE THINGS THAT YOU SHOULDN'T BE SAYING ALOUD IN THE WORKPLACE OR TO YOUR COWORKERS ACCORDING TO CAREERBUILDER.COM.
 

Don't tarnish your reputation by making whiny, haughty or untrue statements. Remember, silence can be golden -- especially if it prevents you from uttering one of these potentially career-damaging phrases:

 

Career planning is not an activity that should be done once — in high school or college — and then left behind as we move forward in our jobs and careers. Rather, career planning is an activity that is best done on a regular basis — especially given the data that the average worker will change careers (not jobs) multiple times over his or her lifetime. And it’s never too soon or too late to start your career planning.

1. Read voraciously literature related to your career Many books are absolute business classics in a general sense and others may be very specific to your chosen domain; consult book reviews and industry journals when uncertain and always aim to stay ahead of the curve in your career reading.

Failure is not optional, it is essential for success.  The sooner that a CEO or a business can understand this fundamental fact, the better the business will become.

1. The most qualified candidate does not necessarily get the job offer

Many times, candidates with lesser qualifications get job offers simply because they’ve prepared and presented themselves in a more compelling way. They “package” themselves better, with an outstanding portfolio of career documents and oral presentation skills. The winning candidate is the one who knows how to tie his or her achievements, strengths and assets directly to the employer’s needs, problems and challenges.

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